The Truth in Social Media

~ a personal essay I submitted for my English class I thought would be nice to share ~

Social media has evolved into an all-pervasive part of the 21st century, imposing a powerful impact on the current generation and the ones to come. 2001 marked the start of the ‘Golden Era’, with the rise of prominent social networks such as Facebook and Twitter leading to a subtle yet significant shift in the public’s perceptions. By the year 2020, worldwide users are predicted to rise to a third of the world’s population, a startling amount of 2.95 billion people.

Image result for social media comic

Social media is both a means for a global society and a gateway for corporate giants, political leaders and governments to influence public perception. The US presidential elections, for instance, have shown the extent to which social media can shape public opinion and put up a false front to the masses. The introduction of this form of technology has led to a change of dynamics in politics, with Donald Trump being a glaring example.

Western governments, namely the US and UK, use social media proactively, in comparison to other world governments, to engage and connect with the public. Most politicians put on the stereotypical facade of being loyal public servants and appeasing to their hundreds of thousands of followers. Trump, however, was blunt and unfiltered in his communications which led to his flame burning brighter than any other.

The world of social media favors controversy to reason. Although social media has led to timely information, transparency and accessibility, the authenticity of these sources is highly questionable. The distinction between real and fake has become increasingly difficult to make. Most of what we see on social media is a mixture of truth and lies, falsities and speculation. This application in a political framework is all the more concerning.

Image result for social media comic

The public perception of hegemonic structures is not as independent from the subject as most would wish to believe. As Louis Althusser proposed, with governments and political leaders exerting their dominance on the masses, everything we consume is a product of selective filtering and control by their very hands. The rise of social media poses a sparkling opportunity for exploitation of the truth that is perceived by the public whose votes and support they rely on.

Perception counts for everything in social media. When, as individuals, we try to project our ideal selves on Facebook and Instagram, it is understandable that politicians too would do the same for personal gain. Their intentions involve increasing their power and avoiding controversy, while simultaneously keeping the public in the dark.

Donald Trump, however, did the opposite and still managed to come out as the victor. By engaging in post-truth politics both online and offline, and portraying himself as an advocate against the media (which largely favored Hillary Clinton and the State), he not only made a spectacle of himself to his 25.7 million Twitter followers but secured public votes too. Objective facts were disregarded in the face of emotionalism. Trump used this to his benefit by feeding off the public’s distrust in government institutions and the media through his campaigns and social media presence. Although most of Trump’s unsubstantiated arguments were far off the spectrum of ‘rational’, his followers perceived it on an emotional level and voted him into presidency.

Image result for social media trump

We live in an information age centered around social media that is a combination of both truth and ‘alternative facts’, Trump popularizing the latter. Social media is a double-edged sword, posing massive benefits to its users while also diluting their perceptions of reality. In the hands of the wrong people, it is a manipulative weapon of the very truth the public wishes to know.

Weigh My Heart.

Kiss your own fingertips
and hug your own curves.
You are made of waves and honey
and spicy peppers when it is necessary.
You are a goddess,
I hope you haven’t forgotten.

I am a mute receiver of fat jokes.

People sometimes look at the top of my head and crack a laugh that I’m a 19 year old grandma due to my premature greying.

Bad skin. Brace-face. Lumbering giant. 

I hear these tiny jabs and I laugh but if people were ever to see the words I carry with me, they would know of the weight their careless whispers are capable of bearing on my soul.

As someone who’s been on both ends of the ‘beauty-scale’ that society so deems, it never fails to disgust me the double-standards that are placed upon us. When I used to look thin, people scrutinized me for ‘never eating’, for having less curves. On the other hand, now when I look a little chubby, people point out my ‘rolls of fat’, suggest I should join the gym and stop ‘pigging out’. All these subtle hints at pretending to look out for me do the opposite effect and destroy my confidence, because they aren’t just hints…they are judgments.

There’s no ‘in between’. Nothing is ever good enough. You’ll never be good enough. 

It’s a struggle I face everyday. My confidence has grown leaps and bounds compared to a couple years ago when the chase for perfection led to a dark time ridden with anxiety and the thought that I’m not worthy as a human being. Because that’s how deep those words can run, and that’s why it’s important to realize that you and I don’t need to be tied down by society’s flawed perception of perfection.

Weigh my heart, not my body. 

Look me in the eye when I speak and see the fire in them, the passion, instead of joking about how many calories I need to burn. Watch me live my dreams and meet every single goal I set for myself, rather than joke about how going to the gym would be a better use of my time. Try and see how much your words can kill my sense of self-worth, and think again before you speak out of ‘good intentions’.

I am a warrior because I’ve learned to pick myself up when you put me down and remember that I am beautiful in any and every form. I’ve learned to love myself, accept my flaws and continuously strive to make myself a better person in the ways that actually matter. You should too. Because if you don’t love yourself, how can you expect others to? As my good ol’ friend Charlie said, “We accept the love we think we deserve.”

Prove to yourselves that you are your own hero. The one person that’ll stay by your side forever is yourself. Love that person. Look yourself in the mirror and appreciate every little thing there is to you – beyond what there is to see. Because as the saying goes, beauty is skin deep.

But your heart and soul weigh so much more.

 

Don’t.

I’m sick.

I’m sick of people thinking they know me when they don’t.
I’m sick of caring about what these ignorant fools say when that’s all their words really are: ignorant.

Don’t think you know all of me when you see the coals of my eyes glitter like falsified gems. Don’t think you can define me by the numbers that attach themselves to my self-worth. Don’t think you can pass the final verdict on my disposition as the Big Bad Bitch.

And if you do, don’t think I care.

Because I’ve learnt not to waste my time on people like you who think what they see is what they get.

I’ve learnt to be free.

Inspired by DailyPost
(although funnily enough, I wrote this exactly an hour before the prompt was out – ’twas meant to be!)

The 2017 Reading Challenge

As someone who loves reading but hasn’t had enough time to dedicate to the beauty of it, I feel like this would be the right time to commit myself to a personalized 2017 Reading Challenge. Granted, 2015’s challenge was a failure but 2016’s went pretty well, I’d like to give it another shot! After all, one can have no regrets in giving books a chance, right?

For this year’s challenge, I’m doing a combination of various challenges I’ve found online as well as my own. Links to the various challenges I’ve borrowed from are provided at the end of this post. I’ll be updating this list and ticking off the challenges I finish as the year progresses. Recommendations would be very much appreciated!

If you, too, are doing the reading challenge, why not join me this year? Drop a comment below and let me know how 2017’s book-journey has been going so far! If you’d like me to review any book in particular, I’d be up for that too.

***

reading_challenge_badge-90820c0c75a5f1231cc641bf3ce2f138

bold: complete
(parenthesis: book assigned to a challenge)

*a book with a color in the title  (The Color Purple)

*a book of letters (Love Letters to the Dead)

*a book by a person of color (Persepolis)

*a book with multiple authors (Let It Snow)

*a bestseller from a genre you don’t normally read (Gone Girl)

*a book by or about a person who has a disability (El Deafo)

*a book you’ve read before that never fails to make you smile (Flipped)

*a book that’s more than a hundred years old (Anna Karenina)

*a book set in a place you want to visit (The Saffron Gate)

*a book inspired by a a fairy tale (Stardust)

*a book under 200 pages (Man’s Search for Meaning)

*a book of poetry (Rumi)

*a book with a child narrator (The Diary of a Young Girl)

*an autobiography (Night)

*a novel set during wartime (A Cup of Tea)

*a book with an unreliable narrator

*a book set in two different time periods (The Next Together)

*the first book in a series you haven’t read before (Artemis Fowl)

*an adult novel (Big Little Lies)

*a Newbery Medal winning book (The Girl Who Drank the Moon)

*a book focusing on mental health (

*a play (Nagamandala)

*a diverse folktale/mythological book (Who Fears Death)

*a book with religious themes (The Red Tent)

*a book on my back list (One Plus One)

*a book by a debut writer (The Hate U Give)

*a book recommendation from a Goodreads pal (How to Be Good)

*a book recommendation from your sibling (The Sword of Shannara)

*a handbook (How to be a Bawse: A Guide to Conquering Life)

*a book by an Indian writer (The God of Small Things)

*a book recommendation from a professor (Waiting for Godot)

*a love story (Eleanor & Park)

*a tragedy (If I Stay)

*a book from your childhood (A Wrinkle in Time)

*your best friend’s favorite (Jane Eyre)

*a French book (Le Petit Prince)

*a controversial book (Lolita)

*a classical romance (Persuasion)

*a book you’ve avoided (The Rape of Nanking)

*a satire (The Importance of Being Earnest)

*a book set in the Victorian Era (Secrets of Midnight)

*a book featuring an animal as the main character (Watership Down)

*a visual novel (Saya no Uta/The Song of Saya)

*a manga (Sakamichi no Apollon/Kids on a Slope)

*a novella (Animal Farm)

*a horror book (In the Miso Soup)

*a book with terrible reviews (Leaves of Grass)

*a book in translation (1Q84)

*a book published the same year you were born (Tuesdays with Morrie)

*a book with a reputation for being un-put-down-able (A Monster Calls)

***

Inspiration from:

http://blog.betterworldbooks.com/2016/12/29/2017-reading-challenge-recommendations/

http://www.popsugar.com/love/Reading-Challenge-2017-42561300

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1NC334TlViCh578-VEl9aUJ3WGAOEYY6R0YuC-MxVRj8/edit

http://modernmrsdarcy.com/reading-challenge-2017/

 

 

 

A Sweet Scintillating Solitude 

When my friend casually asked me what plans I had for Valentine’s Day, I replied, “Netflix, minus the chill,” and we laughed. Hard. A majority of my friends are wonderfully single – reveling in the freedom that a lack of a relationship status gives us. I’m here to tell you that Valentine’s Day is just as much a celebration for us single peeps, as much as it is for the world’s abundance of couples.

ill-be-celebrating-valentines-day-han-style-olo

In India, teenagers entering a relationship is done so with careful scrutiny and as a result, Valentine’s Day isn’t as celebrated as I had expected it to be. My committed friends fear arousing the suspicions of their parents by going out on V-Day which is a normal precaution in an Indian context. It’s a striking contrast to what I experienced in England – where I’ve seen parents encourage their teenage kids to go out with their respective partners. But I’m not here to discuss cultural differences. At least, not today.

For starters, I personally believe that in the old days, Valentine’s Day stood for something. Now, it’s merely an opportunity for the exploitation of mass consumers by profit-thirsty businesses that are just waiting to pounce. That could be the influence of my business degree acting up but, think about how commercial it’s become. Even if I were in a relationship, I wouldn’t want my boyfriend to feel obligated to buy me anything or do anything on Valentine’s Day. Even then, it’s just like any other day because if I were truly in love, every day would be Valentine’s Day.

ovd2

Best Valentine’s Day card ever.

But considering the fact that I’m happily single (it’s not a myth), I’m here to tell you that it’s absolutely okay to not be all about the romance today, or any other day for the matter. Here’s why:

  • You’re single and you’re awesome. Cheesy as hell, I know, but true. You don’t need a relationship to validate your self-worth. You don’t need a date on the supposedly most romantic day of the year to feel special. Learn to love yourself – take that figuratively or literally, whichever is fine as long as you’re happy.

    'Too pricey? Perhaps you wish to see something in macaroni and spray paint?'

  • V-Day Savings – Keeping the big-bad-businesses and corporate culture I mentioned before in mind, if you’re single and on a budget, you would end up saving a huge chunk of your pocket money. You can spend it on food instead. Need I say more?
  • Flirting galore – not that I’m an expert on this topic but remember, you’re not the only single one on the planet today. All of us are looking to have a little flirty-fun, even more so on the 14th of February. Whether it’s casual or all about the play, enjoy your singlehood!
  • ‘Gal’entine’s Day – All the single ladies, put your hands up cause this one’s for you. My girlfriends coined this term today as we finished college and strode out like the total single bosses we are. Why focus on your partners today when you can share the love with your girlfriends? After all, they’ve been there for you through thick and thin, through your singlehood and relationships too. Make it all about the squad.

    all-3

  • Candy Hog – No bae, means no sharing. Which fortunately for you means you can hog the Valentine’s Day candies on sale all for yourself.
  • You’re your own BOSS – There’s no stress to buy presents and make today perfect for your significant other. You can do whatever the hell you want because you are the ruler of your universe. Sleep, game, binge-watch F.R.I.E.N.D.S or do literally anything else you want. It’s up to you.

That, my fellow single-buds, is why today rocks.

Embrace the solitude. Feel the freedom. Dance naked around a tree. Empower yourselves. (Something’s out of sorts here).

Just…be your own Valentine and everything else about today will come secondary to how amazing you really are.

in pursuit of Reality

People live their lives bound by what they accept as correct and true. That’s how they define “reality”. But what does it mean to be “correct” or “true”? Merely vague concepts… Their “reality” may all be a mirage. Can we consider them to be simply living in their own world shaped by their beliefs? – Itachi Uchiha from Naruto

Have you ever had a conversation with someone, perhaps an argument, during which a snide retort may have been thrown about? Something along the lines of, “dude, get real,” because to that person, your perspective couldn’t have been more wrong.  Several times, I have been put in that position and several times, reached the compromise of agreeing to disagree because after all we all have our own set of beliefs, our own opinions.

What if I told you to hold that thought? That, ‘getting real’ is not just some casual shade being thrown your way but an impossible challenge in itself. What if we all lived in our separate realities and no matter how hard we try, we cannot break out of our individual worlds?

When my English professor started the analysis of a short story by Guy de Maupassant titled ‘The False Gems‘, I, along with everyone else in the class had no idea there was more to the text than meets the eye. I was interested in the concept of ‘perception versus reality’ that he put forth, and in particular, the conclusion we arrived at that perception is reality. Some agreed with this, and others did not. I found myself belonging to the former.

Think about it.

reality

The nature of Reality

Reality is a fluid concept that is formed on the grounds of our individual belief systems. Those belief systems may differ from person to person. When my teacher proposed this, it was met by objections from an especially passionate classmate of mine who argued that reality is not fluid but a fixed, changeless state of the world. He pointed out that reality is based upon facts. But…is it really? Isn’t fact a completely distinguishable notion from reality?

Facts can be proven through investigation – that is to say, science. But aren’t the very facts written in textbooks and put forth by scientists all based off judgments made by humans over the course of history? Isn’t it possible to have different interpretations of the same ‘facts’? Different, say, schools of thought?

The problem of defining reality is rooted in our living in a world which forms the ground for our conscious life and yet, cannot be completely deciphered. Hence, we try to perceive it in all the ways we can – through physical and mental means. That, then poses the question of whether reality itself is a physical or mental construction,  or possibly even more than what our range of perception is limited to. It is this puzzle, this mystery of the ultimate truth that scientists try to uncover through observations, and facts.

e426542514f4fdb072de4e4f2bdad52fa115e51f6523b877601c3a052e79750a

Popular German philosopher Immanuel Kant’s idea of the noumenal world presents the possibility that reality is a separate construction, a ‘thing in itself’ – the reality that exists beyond our perception.  According to Kant, the true nature of reality can never be known as we are contained and limited to our individual perceptions of it. He believes our very perception is what disconnects us from reality itself. This poses the alternative notion that perception is not reality but merely, a means by which we can attempt to understand it.

I, personally, believe that perception is reality and we are limited, in this way. However, there is a possibility of a collective reality, shared by those who believe and see things in the same way.  People who are open-minded have an opportunity to widen their perceptions, and as a result, be exposed to a greater scope of reality. By being more receptive of other people’s perceptions, we constantly transform and redefine our own world.

A Marxist Perspective

I don’t know what it is the Germans put in their beer that gets their gears turning but time and again, they produce these genius philosophers that turn things around. Karl Marx – that’s a name that should ring a bell and if it doesn’t…have you been living under a rock? I kid (not).

mental6-6f

 

Dear ol’ Karl is known mostly for his contributions in politics, economics and his ideas on society but a lot of it can be applied to different fields and subjects, including literary theory. Following Karl’s footsteps, some Marxists believe that literature portrays imaginary ways in which people perceive the real world – therefore being a creation in itself of a sub-reality, than a reflection of it.

Louis Althusser (a French philosopher who identified himself as a Marxist) further builds upon this theory by referring to the world we live in as a ‘virtual reality’, a means by which we engage and interact under the influence of culture and ideology. He too believed that our realities are mere constructions of our perceptions, that are formed through hegemonic structures. People in power, that is to say politicians and the government, impose their values on the mass population which soon dominate the mainstream culture. As the political structure changes, with it follows a change in the values and ideology of the people – impacting reality.

Though Althusser brings in a more political view of reality, if you think about how  our governments and political leaders exert their dominance on the people, it brings it into context. Everything we consume is selectively filtered and controlled by those in power. Wouldn’t our realities therefore be confined to the systems we live under?

Transformation of the Inconceivable 

Reality is limitless – and with that realization comes the knowledge that knowledge too, is limitless. Brilliant scientists  such as Stephen Hawking and Albert Einstein have admitted that science itself cannot make a definite claim of what reality is, the latter going so far as to call science his ‘religion’ – deeming it a matter of faith. Every scientific discovery is rooted in the assumption of reality, rather than the certainty of it. For all we know, what we think is real might not be at all.

The vast majority of our population, from what I’ve noticed, are materialists. They believe that what they see, is what they get – that whatever images, sounds and information that their brain processes is the ultimate reality. Can we then pose the question – where did the ability to rationalize reality come from? How does our brain judge real and not real? Can we rely on what our minds concoct to draw the final line between reality and fantasy?

Some turn to religion and their faith for answers. Others, to science. In our pursuit of Reality, as humans we have this unquenchable thirst for knowledge – for the transformation of the inconceivable into a definite truth. However, every door we open just leads us to another endless maze of twists and turns – simply because there is no ultimate ‘Truth’. The subjectivity of our individual perceptions is what stops us from seeing the whole picture, if there even is one.

This is what I believe. But hey, for all I know, I could be wrong. You and I might not be real at all. We might be..in the Matrix.

What it all comes down to is the acceptance of multiple possibilities on the subject of reality. I am open to discussing this with others and learning their views, while at the same time, expanding my own. It’s a never-ending journey of constantly pushing our limits and trying to get as close to the Truth as possible. Personally, as of now there is only one truth I am willing to accept.

w6wrn

At the end of the day, as long as I get my share of finger licking chicken and delectable chocolates, any reality is just fine!

joey-give-me

 

The Beauty of Character-Mania

“I will go to my grave in a state of abject endless fascination that we all have the capacity to become emotionally involved with a personality that doesn’t exist.” – Berkeley Breathed

I can’t begin to tell you how many times I’ve heard people say, “If only they were real!” and understood just how deep those words run. Whether we’re talking about characters from books, movies, TV shows, animes etc. at some point, as readers, we all wish that they existed. To some extent, our desire for them to be real is driven by how much we adore the universe/world they are a part of, or how much we are in love with them. To a greater extent, however, it’s because of just how real these figments of our imagination come to be, and how as people, we are able to relate to them and their story.

Just two weeks ago, before leaving for a challenging exam, I decided to catch up on one of my all-time favorite mangas “Shingeki no Kyojin” (Attack on Titan). Half an hour prior to the exam’s start, I was reduced to tears upon reading the latest chapter and facing the death of one of my favorite characters of all time. I couldn’t get it out of my head through out the exam and in the days that followed.

justinlong_0

On Friday, I begun my obsession with an anime called NANA. After hours of practically binge-watching several episodes, I embarked on a Twitter-rant which provided as an outlet for my out-of-control emotions.

(And that’s just to name a few)

It’s two weeks past the mental funeral I’ve attended for a dear, sweet, boy, and a couple days past the emotional roller-coaster NANA put me in and I’m still mourning for these people, that by definition: are. not. real.

caa365306252b6299ce4c1269c48d774

Am I a freak of nature? No. Is it a crime to have an intense emotional attachment to characters? No. In fact, it’s one of the best things that has ever happened to me.

Growing up, I related more to the people that spoke through literature, through the television screen or in my mind than those that were actually around me. During the day, I’d immerse myself in the real world but once I lost myself in the pages of a book or the colorful screen of the telly, I was whisked away to a world unlike any other. I was among friends. I was home.

That’s not to say that I love every single character I have come across. There are several I’ve come to harbor intense animosity toward, for example, Severus Snape (Harry Potter), Shou Tucker (Full Metal Alchemist), and most recently Patrick Bateman (American Psycho). I am continuously fascinated by how capable characters are of provoking a wide range of emotions from their observers which is exactly why I decided to write about it.

Why do we care?

Now I don’t want to get into the science of it, because, yes, there actually is a logical explanation as to why  we got super attached to characters.

tumblr_mkvd9iEHxQ1s1v24vo1_500

In a nutshell, the descriptive language used in a book or the images that jump out to us from the screen all light up a part of our brain that’s responsible for triggering these ideas by linking it to things we’ve already experienced. That’s why when we come across metaphors or vivid imagery in books, it’s easier for us to picture or feel what the writer is trying to deliver to us.

Personally, I believe what makes a character stand out as more ‘real’ than others would depend on the skill of the writer to engage with the reader through said character. To form the kind of bond with fictional people that normally would take years to form with those around us is a testament to how well they’re written. A prime example here would be the case of how people interpret the book version of Bella Swan versus Kristen Stewart’s rendition of her in the movie. I’m not a Twi-hard, but a lot of my friends have commented that Bella Swan in the books was way more ‘tolerable’ than the version brought to the screen.

Whether or not characters are 100% real, the relationships we form with them play a crucial role in deciding how emotionally real they can be. Don’t we look up to certain characters as role models? Don’t we take something away from every person we read or come across?

Writers create characters that are flawed. They give us the reins, as readers, to step into the shoes of different people and learn about them, learn from them as well. Haven’t you ever wondered you could read someone’s mind, know what their thinking or have an insight into their lives? With characters – that’s exactly what happens. They come to be a part of us through the little discoveries we make with every page we turn.

Mr-Darcy-Fan-Art-pride-and-prejudice-34194572-245-250

Why it isn’t the worst thing

Stories are fragments of the very reality we are a part of. Fiction is a mere expansion of imagination that is grounded in the real world, and in what we experience. That being said, although stories belonging to the genre of fantasy, magic realism, or adventure might not be scientifically possible, their characters are still very much real in the sense that their essence is rooted in what the writers know or have felt. These characters help us understand reality.

As a university student pursing a degree in business, the curriculum still requires it mandatory to take up English and Additional Engish (both covering Literature) as two of my subjects through out four semesters. The texts chosen range from poetry and short stories to plays and articles – but each, chosen with a purpose of enlightening us students in one way or the other. We explore characters that are suppressed because of the color of their skin or their gender. We read the impact that a partition of a country or a mass genocide can have on families, on children.  And while, yes, these stories are a work of fiction, by reading about the thoughts, emotions and inner turmoils of these characters – we learn.

Those who say that ‘living in books’ or taking away learning lessons from literature is foolhardy are speaking utter hogwash. To borrow from Phoebe Buffay, what sad little lives they must lead.

Because what better way to gain wisdom than to live a thousand lives?

That’s what every character gives us: an opportunity to let go of ourselves in their reality, in their lives, and in the process come to understand our own.

tumblr_mfb94aMoYv1qgrjt5o3_250

The best characters are the ones that are every bit as real as us.

The best way to build a three-dimensional character is to make them realistic, and not just in the minds of the writer who is their creator and therefore, naturally, knows their in-and-outs but also to the reader. The thing that most people who frown upon us, lovers-of-fiction, don’t realize is that every character is based on someone, or something, or some iota of reality that the writer themselves draw from.

For instance, dementors in Harry Potter are actually a representation of depression. And while these soul-sucking guards of Azkaban aren’t actually going to pop out and try to kiss us (which would be the worst thing ever), the darkness they act as a symbol of is very much real. Depression is not make-believe.

“It is that absence of being able to envisage that you will ever be cheerful again. The absence of hope. That very deadened feeling, which is so very different from feeling sad. Sad hurts but it’s a healthy feeling. It’s a necessary thing to feel. Depression is very different.”  – J.K Rowling

The characters we relate most to are believable because they are rooted from reality. As readers, we share something in common with them that way making them every bit as real, if not more, than the people around us.

 

chris9n-3-web

Captain America (Chris Evans) visiting a children’s hospital proving that our heroes are real.

If anyone ever tries to put you down by arguing with you and telling you that these people that make you laugh, cry, feel joy or love are a waste of time – just shake your head and feel sorry for them. Because these characters they ridicule?

They are capable of inspiring and changing the lives of millions of people. They aren’t just printed text, no. They bleed through the pages and into our lives, filling the gap between reality and something more. And those who don’t feel that and condemn others that do are highly unfortunate.

deb0b2e05c5d7467b1895ea8cd0801e7

So the next time you encounter someone in a book that makes you feel a whirlwind of emotions; don’t run away. Embrace them, and board the feels train. While the journey is not one that most take, it is definitely the one worth being on.